Posts Tagged ‘shannon lawrence’

Writer’s Night

Pikes Peak Writers is known for our annual conference, but we also do tons of programming throughout the year, much of it free! 

Join Mytchel at the next Writer's Night!
Join Mytchel at the next Writer’s Night!

One of our free monthly events is Writer’s Night, where writers of all genres gather together to discuss writerly topics over food and drinks. Anyone is welcome to attend, whether they have a question to ask or they just want to hang back and listen.

Why Go to Writers Night?

At the last meeting, I asked the attendees for their top reasons to attend Writer’s Night, and here they are:

  1. Hearing from other writers inspires you to keep writing.
  2. It’s nice to be around like-minded people.
  3. Sense of community. Writing is such an isolated experience–sometimes you need to escape it.
  4. Helps fight impostor syndrome.
  5. Exposes you to diverse perspectives.
  6. Casual education. Learn from others while just hanging out!
  7. Bragging rights. Each session, we go around the room and allow people the chance to tell us about their accomplishments.
  8. Gets you out of the house.
  9. You don’t have to make dinner.
  10. Beer!

NEW Location!

We’ve got exciting news to share, too! Writer’s Night is getting a face-lift. It’s moving to Navajo Hogan in August. Plus, we’ve got a new host! Mytchel Chandler has taken over as Writer’s Night host, bringing a fresh perspective to the group.

The Next Writer’s Night is:

Monday, August 26 (every fourth Monday!)
6:30 to 8:30 PM
Navajo Hogan (private room)
2817 N. Nevada Ave.
Colorado Springs, CO 80907

We hope you’ll come check out Writer’s Night and all our other monthly programming! Look for it under “events” on our website or in the events on our Facebook page.


Mytchel Chandler

Mytchel Chandler, Secretary of PPW, has taken over Writer’s Night! Mytchel has written a time travel comic titled Chronic, and is finishing up his debut novel, a YA fantasy titled The Dark and Dangerous Days of Sin Shadow. In his spare time, Mytchel is an avid movie goer, comic collector, and cosplayer. Be sure to follow him @authormytchelchandler on Facebook and Instagram, and at www.mytchelchandler.com.

Things to Remember When Writing Post-Apocalyptic

By: Shannon Lawrence

You’ve envisioned a world where some large-scale event has wiped out hordes of humanity.  Your characters are alive in your head, probably struggling to survive.  You can see the blighted landscape all around you.  What do you need to do now?

There are a few things that must be part of your post-apocalyptic story, or you have no story. 

~An apocalyptic event. 

 That’s right, you can’t have a post-apocalyptic world without something that got them there.  What will yours be?  Viral, bacterial, natural, man-made, space-related or nuclear?  These are all options, and there are probably plenty more.  Did the swine flu get out of hand?  Was it helped by humanity or just one of those things that happens in nature?  Did the Earth tilt too far off its axis?  Did nuclear Hell flame rain down upon the continents?  There must be a reason the people in your story are stuck in this particular landscape.

Four Horsemen of Apocalypse, by Viktor Vasnetsov. Painted in 1887;  Viktor Vasnetsov [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Four Horsemen of Apocalypse, by Viktor Vasnetsov. Painted in 1887; Viktor Vasnetsov [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
~A time frame.

Are they living through the event or has it already happened?  Is it fresh or decades down the line?  You have to know when it happened and what stage humanity is in to really tell your story.  If it happened decades ago, the landscape is going to be significantly different than if it just happened yesterday.  Quality of life will also probably be very different.  If they’ve been coping for decades, they probably aren’t struggling to find food or water sources as much as if it just happened and everything is tainted or burning.  If it’s a new problem, there will be mostly individuals and small groups, whereas a length of time may mean there are established towns/cities.

Stalingrad after the battle;  [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Stalingrad after the battle; [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
~A fully realized landscape. 

World building is important in any story, but you need to build this post-apocalyptic world so that people see your vision of what it looks like.  They must know what your characters’ reality looks like.  Are there fires raging?  Or is everything underwater?  Are there bodies everywhere?  Or has nature reclaimed what once was solely hers?  Let us know what it is your characters are looking at.  Make sure it makes sense for passage of time and the particular event that occurred.

~Strong characters. 

We need to believe that these people can make it (or not, as the case may be).  It must be a real struggle.  We have to care whether they can survive, one way or another.  Maybe we hate this guy so much that we question why he survived, when better people died.  Maybe we love this character and desperately want to see her rebuild her life.  Whichever characters you have, we must believe in them, and they must have a mission, of sorts.  Does Evil Guy want to take over what remains of the world?  Find natural resources to survive?  Or just be left alone?  Does Lovely Heroine have a child to fend for?  Is she just trying to find a home she can call her own?  What drives them?  What are they trying to accomplish?  This is important in every single kind of story you may write, but don’t get so intent on your world building that you forget your characters.

~A purpose. 

All right, we get it.  The world has ended.  The apocalypse has found us.  Whoopty-doo.  What is so important about this world that you just have to tell the story?  What are we going to take away from this?  I’m not talking about a moral (necessarily), but just a life story that means something to us when we read it.  A violent post-apocalyptic world, where survivors are constantly under siege, does us no good if we don’t come out of the story feeling something.  Perhaps you want us to know that humanity will always find a way to thrive.  Or that love will always pull someone through.  Whatever it is, make it part of your story.

The aftermath of Hurricane Camille. Ruins of Texaco gas station with Rambler automobile,  Biloxi, Mississippi, 17 August 1969
The aftermath of Hurricane Camille. Ruins of Texaco gas station with Rambler automobile, Biloxi, Mississippi, 17 August 1969

There are many elements that are important in a story, but these are just a few of the top ones to keep in mind when writing a post-apocalyptic tale. 

Looking for a few good reads?

Want to read a story that takes something familiar and turns it on its head, all the while showing us the strength of humanity and the power of good versus evil?  Read Stephen King’s The Stand.  Watch Book of Eli for another viewpoint.  There’s also The RoadMad MaxWater World (hey, I’m not saying these are all good), The PostmanJericho and The Walking Dead for movies/television shows.  For books, this link should take you to a comprehensive list of classic post-apocalyptic stories.  Of course, The Hunger Games and Forest of Hands and Teeth should be on there.  Also, I recently read Without Warning by John Birmingham, on a whim, and I enjoyed it.  It was more a political/government/military-type book that took on what happened in those facets – so different than I’m used to for this genre, but also quite good. 

I don’t know how The Marbury Lens and The Maze Runner are qualified, but I’d consider both to be sort of post-apocalyptic.  We really aren’t sure with The Maze Runner, but we get a sense something big must have happened, and in The Marbury Lens, the alternative world he visits via the lens seems quite post-apocalyptic.  Both are excellent books, though be aware that The Marbury Lens can be graphic or disturbing, despite being Young Adult.

The short of it is, fully realize your story so we can be drawn into it, feel for your characters, smell the fires, feel a sniffle coming on as everyone dies of the Hulk of flu bugs.  Watch some of these movies or read some of the books (or both) and figure out what you like in them, so you can duplicate that, in a sense.


Shannon Lawrence

A fan of all things fantastical and frightening, Shannon Lawrence writes primarily horror and fantasy. Her stories can be found in anthologies and magazines, including Once Upon a Scream, Dark Moon Digest, and Space and Time Magazine. Her first solo collection of short stories, Blue Sludge Blues and Other Abominations, was released March 1, 2019. When she’s not writing, she’s hiking through the wilds of Colorado and photographing her magnificent surroundings, where, coincidentally, there’s always a place to hide a body or birth a monster. 

Find her at www.thewarriormuse.com,  Facebook or Twitter: @thewarriormuse.

This article reprinted from PPW archives

Sweet Success Shannon Lawrence

Today contributing editor Kathie Scrimgeour shares Shannon Lawrence’s Sweet Success.


lawrence-shannon-blue-sludge-cover

A Sweet Success goes to Shannon Lawrence for the release of her first anthology, Blue Sludge Blues & Other Abominations. This collection of adult horror short stories was released March 15, 2018 by Warrior Muse Press and is available in e-book as well as paperback.

-About the anthology- 

A collection of frights, from the psychological to the monstrous. These tales are a reminder of how

 much we have to fear: a creature lurking in the blue, sludgy depths of a rest area toilet; a friendly neighbor with a dark secret hidden in his basement; a woman with nothing more to lose hellbent on vengeance; a hike gone terribly wrong for three friends; a man cursed to clean up the bodies left behind by an inhuman force. These and other stories prowl the pages of this short story collection. 

-About Shannon-

A fan of all things fantastical and frightening, Shannon Lawrence writes primarily horror and fantasy. Her stories can be found in anthologies and magazines, including Once Upon a Scream, Dark Moon Digest, and Space and Time Magazine. Her first solo collection of short stories, Blue Sludge Blues and Other Abominations, will be released March 1. When she’s not writing, she’s hiking through the wilds of Colorado and photographing her magnificent surroundings, where, coincidentally, there’s always a place to hide a body or birth a monster. 

Find her at www.thewarriormuse.com,  Facebook or Twitter: @thewarriormuse.

Where to buy or read:

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave