Posts Tagged ‘Margena Holmes’

What’s in Your Planner?

By: Margena Holmes

Okay, show of hands—who bought a planner (or you have one on your device) expecting to put all sorts of fun writing things in it for the year (or already had fun things written in)? *raises hand* Back in December when I wrote about planning out your year using a planner I had no idea that 2020 would be the equivalent to playing Jumanji. How many things have you deleted or crossed out because of this pandemic? Probably a lot. There was a meme going around which said the planner was the most worthless purchase for the year. Maaaaybe—or maybe we just need other things to put in it! So what CAN you put in your planner as a writer during these uncertain times?

Protect your writing time

If you’re finding it hard to keep writing during these odd times with family perhaps at home now, add in your writing time and protect that time. With a lot of us out of work from our day jobs (or slowly going back to work, working part-time, etc.) demands for our time from family may have increased. Of course you want to spend time with your family, but make sure you schedule in time to write. That book won’t write itself!

Deadlines

As writers we still have deadlines to meet and goals to reach. I kept a few of my entries in my planner, though some have been moved around quite a bit (which is why I should probably be jotting down my deadlines in pencil!) since I lost my motivation for a while. Putting in deadlines for getting your book edited or published gives you the feeling of being in control and having a purpose to get stuff done.

The What and When

Also, WHAT are you working on that day? World-building? Editing? It’s sometimes helpful to write in what you’re going to work on. If I know I’m going to be working on world-building, I’ll probably need a little less time than, say, if I’m editing a piece.

Another thing you can keep track of is your word counts. Having it written down you can see your growth as a writer. Don’t obsess over it, however. If you only get 100 words written one day, it’s still progress.

Journaling

My planner has boxes for each day to write in, so why not write down how you’re feeling that day? I know with this pandemic, some of us are not feeling our best. You may be able to work out what you’re feeling and who knows? It could turn into inspiration for a story.

Plan your blog posts

I know I’m pretty lax about planning my blog posts, both here and on my author page, and I need to do this more often—jotting down ideas to follow up on later. Take your themes you’ve thought of and plan out your posts. Will you be writing about craft? Or maybe a great story about what happened at a workshop?

These are just a few ideas to make use of that planner you bought back in December. Hopefully things will be back to normal soon and we’ll have lots of events to write into our planner (and don’t tell me you didn’t read the title of this in Samuel L. Jackson’s voice). Happy planning, all!


photo of margin holmes

Margena Adams Holmes has been writing ever since she can remember, writing her first poem in 1st grade. At her day job, when she’s not kicking young kids out of R-rated movies, she’s sweeping up spilled popcorn from the hallways and aisles (she’s not your mother, though, so please take your trash out). Her days off consist of writing science fiction, short stories, and more movie theater shenanigans. Reading is a close second to writing, and she normally has her nose buried in a book. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Finding Motivation to Write in a Stressful Time

Covid-19 has everyone staying at home and most writers I know are in introvert heaven. Stay home? Sure thing! Most of us do that anyway. But even though the stay at home order doesn’t affect us the same way as others, it does affect us.

Many writers just have no motivation to write.

We feel the stress of others. Having this pandemic and having stores, restaurants, and schools closed makes many of us think about the economy. How will these businesses survive? I work at a movie theater for my day job and there are news articles saying that my particular company may not survive this shutdown.  How will restaurants survive? The small businesses survive?

We have our own stressors, too. Everyone panic-bought toilet paper and canned foods. Where are we going to find these items for our own family? How do we keep ourselves safe?

With all this going on I know of many writers who just had no motivation to write. Too busy worrying about everything else to even think of writing. So how do you get that motivation back to write again?

Have A Purpose

When the governor first declared the stay at home order, I thought Cool, I can get a lot of writing done now that I don’t have to go in to work. But, as the reality started to sink in, I had no motivation to do anything creative. I couldn’t edit, I couldn’t write. I thought about my job, now closed, and the economy. How are these places going to survive?  How are we going to survive?

Luckily, April is Camp NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). I had been planning out what I was going to write (funnily enough, about the pandemic) and had my outline written. I was excited to start writing it, and in fact, wanted to start before April 1st. But I followed the rules and started on the first day of Camp NaNo and wrote 1,347 words that first day!

Writing As Therapy

It was actually therapeutic for me, in more than one way, to write out what was going on. It helped to write out my feelings about not being able to find toilet paper (since I didn’t get the memo to buy a ton of it), and also helped me to focus on something other than this pandemic. I was able to think as a writer as I wrote, kind of detaching myself from the issue, but in a way also think as a person, and trying to make sense out of it all.

Take Your Time

Let yourself feel what is going on around you. Don’t try to ignore it, or it will creep up on you and mess with your head. Once you work through what you’re feeling, even just by writing it all down in a journal, you can finally start working on your stories again.

Give yourself time to work through all that is going on around you, be it this pandemic, or any stressor that comes around. It is a stressful time, and if you can keep one aspect of normality in your life, you will be able to keep your sanity and have something to show for it later.

Here are some other inspirational posts to keep you writing:


photo of margin holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Confessions of a Former Pantser

By: Margena Holmes

Can a Pantser Change Into a Plotter?

Like many writers, I often write with no outline, but by the seat of my pants—a “pantser” if you will. Plotting? Meh, who needs it. Planning? Ugh, that’s for wimps. I like to see where my characters want to go within the story, how they get out of any given situation, and what happens next. But sometimes—many times—I’m left trying to figure out just how the hell they got into that mess and how they’re going to get out of it. Help, I’ve written myself into a corner and can’t get out! I’ve had to implement that “What if” questions to get my characters back on track. It works, and I find a way to save my characters from certain doom, but it seems like an awful lot of work for one character. So, what’s a writer—a pantser—to do?

Keeping Things Straight

Lately, I lean more toward plotting my story, filling out every detail of my character, where my story wants to end up, and all the situations where my character(s) may end up. Why the change, you may ask? Well, I’m getting older and I’m finding that keeping everything straight in my head sometimes gets to be confusing. Was his name Rennick or Ronnick? What color was the vehicle? Why does my character love spaghetti here, but loathes it there? Not only that, my plots are becoming more complex as I move through my series, and I have many more ideas for future books. I need timelines for my characters as well as knowing what their home looks like.

Can a Pantser Change Into a Plotter?

It’s been fairly easy to convert into a plotter. For my latest book in my series, I became a “plantser,” a hybrid plotter/pantser. I planned out a few things, but also left some things to chance. Even then, however, I was running into issues. What side did my character get shot on? When did this happen? Who was where when it happened? I’m having to go back a few chapters to find these things out. I’ve started taking notes on my own writing to keep things straight. Some of these things may be trivial, but attentive readers will notice these small discrepancies and call you out on them.

Planning Can Be Flexible

For my next novel I will be planning/plotting every detail to keep things straight, and for my peace of mind. Just because I’ve planned it out doesn’t mean I have to follow it to the letter, though. Want to make the character go out with friends instead of with a date? If it works with your storyline, who’s to say you can’t change it a bit? You can still “fly by the seat of your pants” with minor details and see how your character responds to the change. You can always go back and stick with your original idea and keep those characters under control. They’ll be okay, I promise.


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Writers Conferences and Workshops

 Just Keep Writing

By: Margena Holmes

Writing is a craft that needs to be practiced and honed to get better. What’s out there to help the writer sharpen those skills? Writer conferences, workshops, critique groups, and classes are all out there to help the writer be the best they can be. But where do you find them?

Sharpen your writing skills at a Writers Conference.

Finding a Conference

An easy way to find conferences is to Google “writer conferences” and your city or state. A whole slew of conferences come up. But how do you sort through them all? Reading the description will tell you what kind of conference it is. There are some dedicated just to mystery writers, or science fiction—pretty much any genre! Your local library will also most likely have a list of conferences and workshops in the area. I found Pikes Peak Writers from looking on the library’s website.

Social Media

Another way (and maybe the best way) to find them is word of mouth. We all have writer friends on social media, so ask around, find out what they recommend. I’m sure at least one of your friends has gone to a conference or workshop. Also, you can search Facebook for writer groups, too. Some are affiliated with conferences and workshops, and others are for writers to ask questions or just to vent about their editing process, and will have special days where you can post your work for critiquing by the members to help you out.

A Few Recommendations

One group is Writers Club Live. On the third Saturday of each month, author, ghostwriter, and book coach Christine Whitmarsh hosts a live and virtual workshop focusing on the art and science of writing your book.

My favorite one, of course, is Pikes Peak Writers Conference, held once a year in Colorado Springs. It’s a favorite because it’s near me, but also because of the fantastic classes it offers to all levels of writers, and all stages, from beginning to write your book, to editing, marketing, and more. And, they feed you! The price includes all meals.

Along with their conference, PPW also hosts a lot of monthly events. The Write Brain workshops are usually held on the third Tuesday of the month. The free two-hour workshops bring in experts on writing, with emphasis on craft, as well as experts in other fields to help you make your story real. Make sure you bring something to write and take notes with.

Pikes Peak Writers also hosts a critique group once a month. Sign up to bring in your work you’d like critiqued, or just come in to observe how it works (no sign up necessary).

If you don’t mind travelling, the Southern California Writers Conference is held twice a year, in February (San Diego) and September (Irvine). It’s run very similarly to PPWC and also well worth the price of admission. I’ve attended twice and just one workshop made it worthwhile.

Another conference that is a hot commodity is the 20 Books to 50K Conference, held in Las Vegas. This one sells out in half an hour, that’s how popular it is. It is mostly for self-publishers on how to market and sell their books, but anyone can learn something from the conference. I’ve only heard good things from those who have attended, so I’m going to try to get tickets to this conference this year!

TCK Publishing has an great list of conferences. You can find every genre of writers conferences here, even very specific conferences on subjects like Haiku or Cats.

If you’re a crime or mystery writer, there are a whole slew of conferences and conventions for you throughout the country and abroad. You can find a list of them here.

One final conference to mention will get you out of the rat race and into the mountains of Crested Butte, CO. Murder in the Mountains is a thrilling weekend celebrating all things murder and mystery.

There are many conferences and workshops around in given area if you know where to look (and Google makes it easy) to keep you writing and learning throughout the year. Take a look and see what you can find that is the best fit for YOU. Happy writing!


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Plan Your Writing Year

By: Margena Holmes

Happy holidays! I hope you’ve gotten through Thanksgiving without too much trouble, and Hanukkah/Christmas/Kwanzaa and New Year’s Eve and Day are just around the corner. What’s coming up for your writing year next year? What important dates do you have coming up? Any plans at all?

Start Planning Now

Now is a good time to start planning out your writing year for 2020. What DO you have coming up? Deadlines? Conferences? It’s good to get these things planned out ahead of time so you don’t have any conflicts. I started using a planner this year and it has helped tremendously for deadlines as well as personal events like baby showers.

I use an old school planner notebook to plan out my writing deadlines and what I want to accomplish for the year, but if you’re techy, you can use your phone or tablet. I like to get the pretty planners, and a nice pen, though if you use pencil, you can easily erase if you need to move up or push back a deadline (which I’ve done a lot in the past).

What to put in your planner?

The obvious is deadlines you have. When you plan to have your book finished, sent to the editor, when you’ll be revising, etc. It may seem like micro-managing, but if you have an open-ended date to get your book finished, will you finish it? I base my deadlines on when the next comic cons are in Colorado Springs, so cons usually go into the planner first. I like to have a new book out for those.  Since I self-publish, I need that date so I know when to submit the book and have it printed and sent in time for the Con. Deadlines have a way of sneaking up on you. “Oh, crap, that’s tomorrow?”

Plan for Writing Conferences

Regarding conferences, you’ll want to plan that out to take time off from work if needed, and to make your reservations. It’s helpful, too, if you put reminders in your planner a month or so ahead of time. That way you know what’s coming up. [Don’t forget PPWC2020!]

Don’t Forget Social Media

Do you plan out your social media content? You should! It keeps you engaged with your readers. I Google holidays and national days for each month and plan my content around that.  January 1st is National Bloody Mary Day, February 17th is Random Acts of Kindness Day (I have these in my planner for next year). You can plan a theme for the month, or just randomly post each day or week. If it ties into your book or series, all the better! Social media users like to read about personal things, too, like how you spent your day, or see photos of you at different events.

Contests

Contest deadlines. If you plan on entering contests throughout the year, you will need to know when those are. When to start writing your submission (if needed), the deadline to send it in by, and when they plan on making the announcement of the winners.

Why Plan?

Why plan out your writing year? It helps you stay on track with deadlines, and keeps you engaged with readers. You may not stick to it religiously, but it helps you to know what’s coming up and you can always make adjustments to it, and you won’t be surprised when the Pikes Peak Writers Conference comes up on April 17-19, 2020, almost a month earlier than 2019. Happy planning!


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

A Visit with Laura Ingalls Wilder

By: Margena Holmes

My husband and I recently celebrated our 33rd anniversary by taking a trip to South Dakota. He wanted to visit Mount Rushmore and I figured if we’re going to go there, why not take a trip to De Smet to visit the Laura Ingalls Wilder sites and museum? Laura Ingalls Wilder is the biggest influence of why I’m an author today, so visiting De Smet, where the last five books in her series take place, has been a Bucket List item of mine ever since I found out you can visit the site and see where she lived.

Open prairie at the Homestead of Laura Ingalls Wilder
Open prairie at the homestead of Laura Ingalls Wilder

In her writing, Laura’s use of description painted a picture of everything she saw. As a young girl, she had to become good at describing things. Her sister Mary became blind at the age of 14, so Pa Ingalls told Laura that she had to be her sister’s eyes and “show” her the scenery. That is why as writers we must show what is happening in our stories instead of telling.  We paint the picture for our readers so they can see what the characters see, and experience what is happening in the story.

We first toured the surveyor’s house. While reading the books, I understood the houses that she lived in were small. “Small” to me was having a living room, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a bathroom. The surveyor’s house did have four rooms—three downstairs (the kitchen with a small pantry, and bedroom, and the parlor) and one upstairs (another bedroom). Laura, used to living in smaller houses, called it a mansion! It was about this point of the tour that I found out that Laura was tiny—4’11”. So, when Laura’s father called her his little “half-pint of sweet cider half drunk up” he wasn’t joking!

Claim shanty at the homestead of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
Claim shanty at the homestead of Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Next we drove out to where the Ingalls family had their homestead. The house was gone, but there were other things to experience. The five cottonwood trees that Pa Ingalls planted for each of the girls and Ma Ingalls were still standing. As I stood in that area, I tried to imagine how Laura might have seen everything for the first time. I could truly see why Pa Ingalls had spent the night at the land office to make sure he got that parcel of land. Everything was as Laura described. The Big Slough with its coarse grasses, the soft grasses of the prairie, and the flat land with little prairie swells, though there are more trees there now than were probably there in Laura’s time. Pa Ingalls said at the time that tree claims would put trees all over the area, and it looks to be true.

Author Margena Holmes enjoys the trees around the homestead.
Author Margena Holmes enjoys the trees Charles Ingalls planted around the homestead.

There was also a replica of the dug-out house that they lived in on Plum Creek in Minnesota. It was exactly as Laura described it in her books—dirt floor, sod walls, and you wouldn’t know it was there until you had gone down the hill. I remember reading this as a young girl and I could smell the scents of the dirt as I read. This smelled just like I remembered reading.

Through Laura’s description of the area, I felt like I had seen these places already. That is why, as writers, we need to make our descriptions as real as possible, to bring the reader into the story. Laura did well in describing her life on the prairie.


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

I Want to Write a Book Someday

By: Margena Holmes

We’ve all heard that phrase before, either from someone we’ve just met (once they find out we’re writers), or someone we know well and they want advice on how to start writing. What do you tell them?

Is it easy?

Most people think that writing is easy. You just sit down and write, right? Well, yes and no. What are you going to write about? When people tell me they want to write a book, most of the time they have no clue what they want to write about. I’m pretty sure they think being an author is some kind of glamorous life where lots of money is to be made, and we get inspiration every day. Well, news flash—it doesn’t always work out that way. I wish it did!

What makes your story unique?

Be Unique

That is the hard part—thinking about something to write, and writing it in a different way that hasn’t been done before. Remember, every topic has pretty much been written about before so what makes YOUR story unique?

Write, write, and write some more!

People (mostly teens with their parents) have come up to my table at comic cons and say they want to be a writer, and what should they do? Heck, if I had all the answers, I’d be making millions! What I DO know and can tell them is to read, read, read, and then write, write, write. Write about your day, write about a scene you might have witnessed. Practice your craft as much as you can. These kids are usually sincere about wanting to be a writer, and I will help them in any way I can.

What about the ones who say they want to be a writer and when you ask them what they want to write about, they give you a blank stare, or tell you, “Oh, I don’t know yet”? I’ll tell them the same thing as I tell anyone else—read and write and practice. I can always tell if they are serious by what happens next. If they get excited over the advice and start asking more questions, they genuinely want to write. If they say, “Oh, I don’t think I need to read, I just want to write something.” Welp, they’re enamored by the thought of it but don’t want to put in the work.

Writing is a process

And it is work. You have to think of what to write, outline it (unless you’re a pantser), write it, rewrite it, then either have a critique partner or beta reader read it, make more changes, THEN it’s ready for the editor. You’ll probably want to read books about the craft of writing, attend some writers conferences (which isn’t work to me because I love to learn), and read some more.

I’m still waiting for the ones who’ve said they want to write a book (and have asked for my advice) to write their book. How many people have told you they want to write a book? What do YOU tell them?


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Imposter Syndrome

by: Margena Holmes

As an author, you will almost always have doubts at one time or another about your writing. Is it good enough? Am I good enough? How does an author feel validated? You may have a case of Imposter Syndrome.

What exactly is Imposter Syndrome?

Imposter Syndrome is a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts their accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a “fraud”. You may feel inadequate or incompetent as a writer despite evidence to the contrary.

Don't let Imposter Syndrome stop you from writing.

What Equates Success?

My problem with Imposter Syndrome is that I sometimes don’t feel validated as an author because I’m not “successful” in my eyes. But what equates to success? Having a certain number of books out? If that means success, then yes, I’m a successful author, having five books published and three more coming out this year (well, that’s my goal, anyway). I’m not prolific, but I’m trying to keep a steady pace of publishing books, with a goal of one a year now. I know authors who do more, but in many cases, writing IS their job. I work outside the home, so I have to plan my writing time around my work days as well as watching my grandson on some days and evenings.

Does successful mean having lots of sales? In that case, no, I’m not successful. I know of some indie authors who have weekly book sales, and they are bummed when they don’t sell a book in one particular week. I’d LOVE to have a book sold each week. My marketing skills suck, but I’m trying to learn more about marketing through reading books, like Craig Martelle’s Become A Successful Indie Author, Unmarketing by Scott Stratten, and Online Marketing for Busy Authors by Fauzia Burke. But I digress.

How about reviews on Goodreads and Amazon? I have a few of those, and they make me feel good about being an author (the good ones, anyway. The so-so ones leave me feeling like a fraud again). I’d love for a random reader to say they just found my book on Amazon and read it and loved it. I do have a couple of reviews from random readers, and they make me think, well, maybe I do have a handle on this writing thing.

How to Get Past it

How does one get over this sense of feeling like a fraud? Well, writing can be an isolating career, so talk with other writers. I’m sure they’ve felt the same way at some point in their career. Also, remind yourself of how hard you’ve worked to get where you’re at now. How many hours have you spent writing and editing? Those add up to being successful.

Reflect on positive feedback. I know authors aren’t supposed to read their book reviews, but that may help you to realize you are not a fraud. If you don’t have a book published yet, what positive feedback have you received from critique groups and beta readers? Focus on that.

A lot of people know that I’m an author and when they mention me and how many books I’ve published, I feel kind of embarrassed, because I don’t feel successful in my eyes. I don’t claim to know everything about writing and that’s why I go to writer’s conferences and workshops as often as I can to keep learning about the craft, and like I said above, I read a lot. I enjoy learning because it helps me to become a better author and maybe with that and the steps above I will overcome Imposter Syndrome and I’ll finally feel validated as a writer.


Margena Holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.

Sweet Success for Margena Holmes

by: Darby Karchut

Congratulations to Margena Adams Holmes on the release of EVALYCER’S WAR, (July 9, On The Line Press), a novella set in The Elixir Series.

Avalycer's War

As Evalycer gets more involved with a group wanting to change a corrupt government, she struggles between wanting change and doing the right thing. Part of The Elixir Series but can be read as a stand alone book.

photo of margin holmes

Margena has been writing ever since she can remember, writing her first poem in 1st grade. At her day job, when she’s not kicking young kids out of R-rated movies, she’s sweeping up spilled popcorn from the hallways and aisles (she’s not your mother, though, so please take your trash out). Her days off consist of writing science fiction, space opera, and more movie theater shenanigans. Reading is a close second to writing, and she normally has her nose buried in a book. Visit her website.

EVALYCER’S WAR: Novella in The Elixir Series.
E-book; Science Fiction; novella; 118 pages
Purchase at Amazon.com


Darby Karchut

Sweet Success is coordinated by Darby Karchut. If you have a success story to share please go to the Sweet Success form.

Marketing on a Budget

by: Margena Holmes

Start marketing when you start writing.

Marketing—one of the least favorite things a writer needs to do. We have to come out of our writing cave and actually talk to people about our books. They say (and just who are “they”?) you should start marketing when you start writing your book. But how does one do so effectively? I haven’t a clue! Okay, I have a little bit of a clue. All kidding aside, there are several ways to market your book and yourself.

Facebook Groups

The easiest and least expensive way to market your book is through Facebook groups. There are sooo many groups on Facebook dedicated to readers, authors, and promotions, and a lot of these groups will host events for authors to sell their books. Join them and then start posting your information on your books. Make sure you follow their rules for posting (once a week? Once a month?) and then change it up a bit each time you post within that group.

Make up an ad in Paint, Photoshop, or Canva one week, then post a description of your book next time. Include a link to where readers can purchase the book, and always include a picture no matter how you advertise. Photos draw potential readers in, as social media is very visual. This is one of the things you can do before your book is even released to build excitement and generate interest for your book.

Amazon Marketing Services

Another good way to advertise is Amazon Marketing Services. Starting from your KDP page, select which book you want to promote and follow the prompts. It will ask you the amount you want to spend per click, how long you want to run the campaign, and if you want to customize your ad. I was finished with my ad in under fifteen minutes.

Book Signings

I like to think outside the box, too. Does your book have a theme? Tie in a book signing to the theme of your book! It’s a great way to advertise. For my book Dear Moviegoer, I asked a movie theater if I could set up a table to display my books on an afternoon during a major movie release. You could do the same for a science fiction book, fantasy, horror, etc.

Comic Cons

Comic Cons are also a good way to get yourself and your book out to readers, but they could be hit-or-miss depending on the Con. I’ve had some success with big and small ones, but it depends on the type of Con. They’re not cheap, though, and you probably won’t make your money back, but it’s a fun way to sell your book and talk to readers, especially if you like going to Cons anyway.

Printed Material

If the thought of having to talk to so many people makes you a little queasy, see about placing business cards, postcards, or flyers on tables of cafes, bookstores, and restaurants. Ask first, however. You don’t want your items tossed into the trash by the manager.

Vista Print

There are several places to get advertising materials made inexpensively. I like Vista Print. They always have a deal running for something. You can get 500 business cards for $10. Look around and see if there are other deals by other companies. You can always mix and match—get your business cards from one place and bookmarks from another (though if you want them to match, it may be better to pick one company).

Marketing is a necessary evil that we writers must do to advertise our books and ourselves, whether we like it or not. Get creative and have fun with it!


photo of margin holmes

Margena Adams Holmes was born in Bellflower, CA sometime in the 1960s. She has always had a love for both reading and writing, writing her first song/poem in 1st grade. Margena is a big supporter of indie authors and will read anything that draws her into the story. She is an observer of life, and many everyday things could (and do!) end up in her writings. Her publications are available through her author page. Contact Margena via email: jedi_anegram@hotmail.com.