Posts Tagged ‘Darby Karchut’

Welcome to Sweet Success!

New Coordinator for Sweet Success Darby Karchut

Writing from the Peak is happy to welcome Darby Karchut as the new coordinator for the Sweet Success column. She is excited to get started and her first Sweet Success will post on Friday.

Darby Karchut

Darby Karchut is an award-winning author, dreamer, and compulsive dawn greeter. A native of New Mexico, she now lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, where she runs in blizzards and bikes in lightning storms. When not dodging death by Colorado, Darby is busy wrangling words. Her thirteenth book, DEL TORO MOON, a middle grade western/fantasy mashup (Owl Hollow Press) is the 2019 Colorado Book Award Winner-Juvenile Literature
Visit the author at her website: www.darbykarchut.com.

Do you have exciting news you want to share with the world? A book launch? Signing party? A Sweet Success? If so, hop over to the Sweet Success submission form to get started. Darby looks forward to hearing from you.

Sweet Success for Darby Karchut

Sweet Success is happy to announce the release of Darby Karchut’s middle grade novel, DEL TORO MOON. Mark your calendar to join her October 2, 2018 for her virtual launch.

Del Toro Moon cover“Ride hard, swing hard, and take out as many of those creepy critters as you can.” Twelve year old Matt Del Toro is the greenest greenhorn in his family’s centuries-old business: riding down and destroying wolf-like monsters, known as skinners. Now, with those creatures multiplying, both in number and ferocity, Matt must saddle up and match his father’s skills at monster whacking. Odds of doing that? Yeah, about a trillion to one. Because Matt’s father is the legendary Javier Del Toro—hunter, scholar, and a true caballero: a gentleman of the horse. Luckily, Matt has twelve hundred pounds of backup in his best friend—El Cid, an Andalusian war stallion with the ability of human speech, more fighting savvy than a medieval knight, and a heart as big and steadfast as the Rocky Mountains. Serious horse power. Those skinners don’t stand a chance.

 

 

Darby KarchutDarby Karchut is an award-winning author, dreamer, and compulsive dawn greeter. A proud native of New MDarby karchut link to Virtual launchexico, she now lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, where she runs in blizzards and bikes in lightning storms. When not dodging death by Colorado, Darby is busy wrangling words. Visit Darby’s website. She can be contacted at: darbykarchut@gmail.com.

 

 


Sweet Success logoDo you have a Sweet Success you would like to share? Click here to get started, or send an email to: SweetSuccess@pikespeakwriters.com

Sweet Success is coordinated by Managing Editor, Kathie “KJ” Scrim.

Proofing the Proof

There is more to proofing a book than just reading the story.

At some point in every writer’s career, you’ll be asked to proof a final version of your work.
Sure, you’ll have various editors doing this, but you’ll need to be a part of it, too. After all, it’s YOUR name on the cover and you want it to be as perfect as possible.

Even at the manuscript stage, submitting a well-polished story will help your work stand out. It shows agents and editors that you are industry-savvy.

There is more to proofing a book, however, than just reading the story (aka body matter). It means examining literally every centimeter of the product. During this process, I get down to some serious detailing, checking for any and all mistakes, and taking copious notes—old school style.

Take copious notes...old school style.

Over the years, I’ve developed a checklist to make sure I don’t miss anything. I break the task into sections, moving from easy to more difficult; mostly to warm up and to feel like I’ve accomplished something. Remember, for each item on this list, we’re looking for spelling, grammar, punctuation, correct vocabulary, correct numbering and sequence, etc. Read stuff aloud—it helps like nothing else to catch mistakes.

Cover

  • Front
  • Spine (place your book on its back. The words on the spine should read left to right)
  • Back (correct jacket copy, ISBN number, publisher’s contact info, etc.)

Front Matter

  • Praise Page
  • Title Page (called the recto side)
  • Copyright Page (called the verso side)
  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgements (unless this is at the end, then skip for now)
  • Table of Contents (if applicable)
  • Foreword (if applicable)
  • Preface or Introduction (if applicable)

End Matter

  • Acknowledgements (here’s where you want to triple check that you’ve spelled your publisher, agent, editors, publicists, and cover artist names correctly, as well as everyone else you want to thank)
  • Discussion Questions
  • Author Interview or Q & A
  • Author’s Bio (triple check that your contact info is correct)

Chapters and Pages

  • Check each chapter title for sequential numbering. Trust me on this.
  • Check each page for sequential numbering. Trust me more.
  • Orphans and Widows. Tedious, but it must be done.

Body Matter

  • Read your story aloud. This is single most productive use of your time at this stage. As I mentioned earlier, you’ll catch dropped words, repetitive vocabulary, and grammar mistakes like crazy.
  • Proper nouns (characters, locations, etc). Keep a cheat sheet nearby.
  • Foreign languages. Triple-check spelling and punctuation. Then, check them once more. Get this right.
  • Paragraphs. Make sure the breaks are correct.

This sounds so easy and straightforward, but you and I both know this is blood-letting time. Re-reading a manuscript you’ve labored over for months or years can be downright nauseating. I don’t know about you, but I spend a lot of time cringing, too.

But.

But.

But, I often find myself enthralled with the story, and a bit in awe of some writing I didn’t remember producing. Which is pretty cool. It is really okay, you know, to feel pride and satisfaction in your creation. If we writers (or painters or musicians or dancers) do not cherish our work, then our readers or viewers won’t either. So, proof away and be prepared to fall in love again.


Darby KarchutDarby Karchut is an award-winning author, dreamer, and compulsive dawn greeter. A proud native of New Mexico, Del Toro Moon Book Covershe now lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, where she runs in blizzards and bikes in lightning storms. When not dodging death by Colorado, Darby is busy wrangling words. Her latest book (lucky number thirteen), DEL TORO MOON, releases October 2 from Owl Hollow Press. Visit the author at her website.

Cover Reveal – Darby Karchut’s Del Toro Moon

Del Toro Moon Book Cover

Please join me in congratulating Pikes Peak Writers member Darby Karchut and cover artist Risa Rodil as we take part in the cover reveal for Darby’s Del Toro Moon, due out this fall.   [ed]


Bad enough Matt Del Toro is the greenest greenhorn in the family’s centuries-old business: riding down and destroying wolf-like creatures, known as skinners. He must also learn how to match his father’s skills at monster hunting. Odds of doing that? Yeah, about a million to one. Because Matt’s father is the legendary Javier Del Toro—hunter, scholar, and a true caballero: a gentleman of the horse.

Now, with the skinners multiplying, both in numbers and ferocity, Matt is desperate to keep his father and hot-tempered older brother from killing each other, prevent his new friend, Perry—a horse-crazy girl who recently moved to their small town of Huerfano, Colorado—from discovering the true nature of his odder-than-oddball family, and save a group of paleontologists from getting skinner-ed.

Luckily, Matt has twelve hundred pounds of backup in his best friend—El Cid, an Andalusian war stallion with the ability of human speech, more fighting savvy than a medieval knight, and a heart as big and steadfast as the Rocky Mountains.

Serious horse power.

Those skinners don’t stand a chance.  

Del Toro Moon by Darby Karchut

Coming September 2018 from Owl Hollow Press

Middle Grade fantasy

www.darbykarchut.com

www.owlhollowpress.com

Goodreads


The cover was designed by Risa Rodil ( www.risarodil.com ) a popular MG/YA book cover artist. Her other clients include Disney, Nickelodeon TV, Penguin Random House, and Harper Collins.


Darby Karchut is a multi-award winning author, dreamer, and compulsive dawn greeter.  A proud native of New Mexico, she now lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, where she runs in blizzards and bikes in lightning storms. When not dodging death by Colorado, Darby is busy at her writing desk. Her books include the best selling middle grade series: THE ADVENTURES OF FINN MacCULLEN. Best thing ever: her YA debut novel, GRIFFIN RISING, has been optioned for film.

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Crafting Authentic Books for Boys

Today’s post is from Darby Karchut, one of the six authors who participated in Write Your Heart Out 2018.  

Each of these talented individuals gave us a taste of the in-depth session they’ll be presenting at Pikes Peak Writers Conference 2018: Cindi Madsen, LS Hawker, M.B. Partlow, Kristy Ferrin, Debbie Maxwell Allen, and Darby Karchut.

For those who missed Your Heart Out, today Darby Karchut shares her expertise on Writing for Boys.Darby has a passion and an uncanny ability to get into the heads of middle-school aged boys. Read up here and consider attending her session at Pikes Peak Writers Conference 2018.  You won’t regret it.  -Gabrielle V Brown, Managing Editor


For folks who weren’t able to attend the 6th Annual Write Your Heart Out (the Pikes Peak Writers Conference’s sneak preview) on Saturday, March 3rd, I’m pleased to share an overview from my presentation entitled “This One’s for the Boys: Crafting Authentic Books for Boys.”

Based on the stages of their brain development, boys are more likely to:

  • act on impulse
  • misread or misinterpret social cues and emotions
  • engage in dangerous or risky behavior
  • unable to see potential consequences of their actions
  • struggle to modify their dangerous or inappropriate behaviors
  • tend to lag socially behind girls, and not catch up both physically and mentally until the teen years

That said:

  • they are capable of great insight and worldly reflections, mature emotions and mature decision-making, but they cannot sustain it for long periods
  • hence the rollercoaster we often see in older children and teens
  • Children mature differently at this age; okay to write unsophisticated teens
  • But, they all have one foot in childhood and one foot in adulthood, especially in MG and younger teen books
  • Dialogue should reflect this back-and-forth

Think about:

  • Starting your story with a bang (physical or emotional)
  • Throughout the story, ask boy questions:

How do I position myself with others?

How do I become a man?

Whom do I model myself after?

What do I aspire to do and to be?

  • Writing up, not down (honor your reader’s intelligence)
  • Making every character the hero of his own story (even the villain)
  • Using smart humor: body fluids/sounds can only go so far
  • Appealing to your reader’s sense of mischief; make them laugh, especially after an intense scene

Something I noticed:

  • Boys act and talk side-by-side
  • Girls act and talk face-to-face
  • Boys touch each other more than they used to (hands on shoulders, etc.)

What my male students told me:

  • Don’t minimize emotions (boys have them, just express them differently)
  • They are more clued into things than adults give them credit for, but sometimes, they don’t care
  • The boys wondered why book after book have horrible parents, so don’t be afraid to incorporate decent adult figures

Writing for boys—especially our middle school guys—is my passion. Why? I don’t know. It just seems that my world view’s default setting is from the perspective of a twelve year old boy. Does it matter? Nope. Not one bit. I write me. You write you. It’s all good. But I can tell you that boys who read grow up to become men who think and feel. Reason enough.


Darby Karchut is a multi-award winning author, dreamer, and compulsive dawn greeter.  A proud native of New Mexico, she now lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, where she runs in blizzards and bikes in lightning storms. When not dodging death by Colorado, Darby is busy at her writing desk. Her books include the best selling middle grade series: THE ADVENTURES OF FINN MacCULLEN. Best thing ever: her YA debut novel, GRIFFIN RISING, has been optioned for film. Her latest book, DEL TORO MOON, releases Fall 2018 from Owl Hollow Press. She is represented by Amanda Rutter at Red Sofa Literary. Visit the author at www.darbykarchut.com

 

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